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We now have two new birds for our list:

1) Grayish Mourner: we found this bird feeding on some fruiting trees (probably) at our “backyard” just behind the lodge. This forest species usually forages alone or in pairs in mid and higher levels.

2) Plumbeous Kite: amazingly this common summer migratory raptor wasn’t on our list until now. Maybe they avoid extensive forest areas? It was seen soaring at the Fita Branca viewpoint.

We have always knew that there are Jaguars and Pumas here at primary forests of Zizo. The Puma we see foot tracks regularly, and have even seen the cat itself on a few occasions. But the Jaguar is rare here in the Atlantic Rainforest. We have records of its foot track (much larger than a Puma) but never got a glimpse of one.

This past weekend clients Guilherme Ortiz, Professor Reginaldo (UNESP) and Octavio Salles got extremelly close to one. The alledged Jaguar growled at them from a very close distance, maybe not more than 5 meters away. Check the detailed report of the encounter at Octavio’s blog: http://octaviosalles.com.br/blog_english

We are extremelly happy with this, it proves yet again how helthy our forests are.

This past week we received the visit of Octavio Campos Salles and his client, Mark, and Guilherme Ortiz. They stayied for 4 days and even though they were primarily photographing and not exactly birding, they still saw one new bird for the reserve each day, including an exciting Pavonine Cuckoo that was singing constantly behind our kitchen but unfortunately in an area without acces in thick vegetation, and since the bird did not respond to playback to move in closer, they did not see it. But neverthless, it was a Pavonine Cuckoo without a doubt. Another great new addition was the Brassy-breasted Tanager, a common bird elsewhere but strangely without a record here, until now. They were feeding on fruiting trees beside the lodge and was seen for a couple days there. 

Feeders were very busy, as usual during winter time, and they made some great photos there and also at the forest around the lodge. One of the highlights was a Black Hawk-Eagle that attacked something (probably a pigeon) just a few meters from the feeder, the action was just too fast to be photographed though. Constant low fog through the week, and some drizzle, prevented them from seeying soaring hawks or more owls.

Yellow-olive Tanagers

Red-necked Tanager

Black-throated Trogon, male

Here’s a bird list of the trip, a total os 110 species recorded:

Red: heard only
Black: seen
Green: new species to the list

Solitary Tinamou

Brown Tinamou

Black-fronted Piping-Guan

Spot-winged Wood-Quail

Black Vulture

Black Hawk-Eagle

Barred Forest-Falcon

Slaty-breasted Wood-Rail

Picazuro Pigeon

Plumbeous Pigeon

Gray-fronted Dove

Maroon-bellied Parakeet

Blue-winged Parrotlet

Plain Parakeet

Scaly-headed Parrot

Squirrel Cuckoo

Pavonine Cuckoo (H)

Tawny-browed Owl

Gray-rumped Swift

Dusky-throated Hermit

Scale-throated Hermit

White-tailed Trogon

Black-throated Trogon

Surucua Trogon

Rufous-capped Motmot

Crescent-chested Puffbird

Saffron Toucanet

Red-breasted Toucan

Ochre-collared Piculet

White-spotted Woodpecker

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker

Green-barred Woodpecker

Blond-crested Woodpecker

Lineated Woodpecker

Robust Woodpecker

Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper

Rufous-capped Spinetail

Pale-browed Treehunter

Ochre-breasted Foliage-gleaner

Black-capped Foliage-gleaner

White-collared Foliage-gleaner

White-eyed Foliage-gleaner

Olivaceous Woodcreeper

Lesser Woodcreeper

Planalto Woodcreeper

Black-billed Scythebill

Spot-backed Antshrike

Tufted Antshrike

Giant Antshrike

Variable Antshrike

Spot-breasted Antvireo

Plain Antvireo

Ferruginous Antbird

Ochre-rumped Antbird

Star-throated Antwren

White-shouldered Fire-eye

Squamate Antbird

Short-tailed Antthrush

Such’s Antthrush

Variegated Antpitta

White-breasted Tapaculo

Bay-ringed Tyrannulet

Planalto Tyrannulet

Greenish Tyrannulet

Eared Pygmy-Tyrant

White-throated Spadebill

Sepia-capped Flycatcher

Yellow-olive Flycatcher

Gray-hooded Flycatcher

Sulphur-rumped Flycatcher

Long-tailed Tyrant

Great Kiskadee

Three-striped Flycatcher

Gray-hooded Attila

Sharpbill

Cinnamon-vented Piha

Hooded Berryeater

Blue Manakin

Pint-tailed Manakin

Greenish Schiffornis

Crested Becard

Chestnut-crowned Becard

Rufous-browed Peppershrike

Blue-and-white Swallow

Southern House Wren

Long-billed Gnatwren

Rufous-bellied Thrush

White-necked Trush

Green-headed Tanager

Red-necked Tanager

Brassy-breasted Tanager

Blue Dacnis

Azure-shouldered Tanager

Sayaca Tanager

Palm Tanager

Red-crowned Ant-Tanager

Olive-green Tanager

Ruby-crowned Tanager

Black-goggled Tanager

Magpie Tanager

Blue-black Grassquit

Saffron Finch

Black-throated Grosbeak

Tropical Parula

Golden-crowned Warbler

Riverbank Warbler

Red-rumped Cacique

Golden-winged Cacique

Chestnut-bellied Euphonia

Blue-naped Chlorophonia

This week the park caretaker, Jorge, was working on the trail bordering the Ouro Fino River when he saw a big bird near the waterfall. When approached the bird flew towards a tree branch above, allowing for this grab shot. The exciting part as that this is a Fasciated Tiger-Heron, one of the most rare of all Atlantic Rainforest birds! This bird was seen before by a few different people near this same spot, but never a photo was taken… until now.

This also probably represents the 1st. photo ever of the species in SE Brazil. Ok, it’s not a great photo, but at least is one! This species inhabits only fast water creeks inside primary deep forest.

Fasciated Tiger-Heron (Tigrisoma fasciatum). Photo: Jorge.

Southern Muriqui

Here’s a photo of a Southern Muriqui seen by guide Octavio Salles and his client Sérgio Salvador, who took the picture. The group of monkeys was located just 10 minutes from the lodge at the Waterfall Trail, feeding on a large fruiting tree together with Howler and Capuchin monkeys! The Muriqui is the largest primate in the Americas and, unfortunately, one of the most endangered too.

 

 

Here at Parque do Zizo we are proud with the fact that a lot of great birds are seen right from the lodge or just a few meters from it. We believe this happens because we are located right in the middle of prime habitat and that we cause very litle modification on the natural routines: the lack of energy to disrupt nocturnal animals; the total absense of domestic animals like dogs or cats; the small groups we receive at any one time, etc.

This past week Octavio and his clients saw for several times right behind the rooms a cotingid that usually is only found inside primary rainforest, the Cinnamon-vented Piha. Octavio even took the photo below.

Cinnamon-vented Piha photographed just a few meters from the lodge rooms.

Other great birds that had been seen right around the lodge include Black Hawk-Eagle, Collared Forest-Falcon, Helmeted Woodpecker, Buff-fronted Owl, Mottled Owl, Bare-throated Bellbird, Pin-tailed Manakin (frequent, actually!), Solitary Tinamou, Black-fronted Piping-Guan, Spot-billed Toucanet, and many others.

This past week we received the visit of guide Octavio Campos Salles with his client. They spent 5 days here and had some memorable moments, like the close encounter with 3 monkey species at the same time on the Ouro Fino Trail (just near the lodge!). They first saw a group of Howler Monkeys high up on a jatobá tree, a couple minutes later they saw some crazy Capuchin Monkeys jumping over 10 meters from one tree to another! Then the biggest surprise of all, a group of the rare and endangered Southern Muriqui Monkeys (the largest primate in the Americas, except us humans of course) came crossing the river to feed on a fruiting tree just above their heads! Amazing rare and close encounter with these incredible animals.

As far as birds lets just say that they saw a lot, 147 total. Here’s a list with some comments:

Red: heard only

Black: seen

Green: new species to the list

Solitary Tinamou – regularly heard on the hills surrounding the lodge.

Brown Tinamou – a fleeting view of one at the end of the Ouro Fino Trail.

Dusky-legged Guan – an adult and a baby at the Main Trail.

Black-fronted Piping-Guan: best-ever views of one at the summit of the Birder’s Trail.

Spot-winged Wood-Quail: heard a group chorusing behind the lodge.

Black Vulture

Swallow-tailed Kite: a group of around 30 birds first sitting on top of the huge jatobá tree at the aptly named Jatobá Trail. They all flew off at the same time, a great view!

Mantled Hawk: close views of a bird soaring and screaming at the Main Track.

Roadside Hawk: several at the Entrance Track before the parking lot.

Black-and-white Hawk-Eagle: this uncommon large eagle is becoming a regular at Zizo. Seen soaring over the lodge area.

Barred Forest-Falcon: heard daily at dawn next to the lodge, seen once.

Collared Forest-Falcon: heard behind the lodge once.

Slaty-breasted Wood-Rail: a family of 4 lives at the pond next to the lodge. Seen daily.

Picazuro Pigeon

Plumbeous Pigeon

Gray-fronted Dove

Maroon-bellied Parakeet

Blue-winged Parrotlet

Plain Parakeet

Red-capped Parrot: good views of a pair feeding at the summit of Birder’s Trail.

Scaly-headed Parrot

Blue-bellied Parrot: two birds flying at the beggining of the Ouro Fino Trail.

Squirrel Cuckoo

Striped Cuckoo: two birds seen the Main Track and fantastic views of one in the open at the Entrance Track before the parking lot.

Tawny-browed Owl: one found during the day at the Jatobá Trail, another one (maybe the same individual) singing behind the lodge at dawn.

Least Pigmy-Owl: one seen well at the summit of Birder’s Trail.

Common Pauraque: one bird seen at the Entrance Track before the parking lot at night.

Short-tailed Nighthawk: a few of these migrant birds seen daily at dawn or dusk hawking insects over the lodge area.

White-collared Swift: large groups seen everywhere, great views at the Fita Branca viewpoint.

Gray-rumped Swift

Saw-billed Hermit: mosty at the Ouro Fino Trail.

Dusky-throated Hermit

Scale-throated Hermit

Violet-capped Woodnymph

White-tailed Trogon

Black-throated Trogon: great views at the lodge and Entrance Track.

Surucua Trogon: mostly at the lodge.

Rufous-capped Motmot: heard daily at dawn.

Crescent-chested Puffbird: seen well at the lodge and at the Ouro Fino Trail.

Saffron Toucanet: common, seen on several occasions.

Red-breasted Toucan: seen from the Main Track.

Ochre-collared Piculet

White-spotted Woodpecker

Yellow-fronted Woodpecker

Blond-crested Woodpecker

Robust Woodpecker: a pair seen at the Entrance Track.

Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper: usually seen at the Ouro Fino river, this time it was located at the pond next to the lodge.

Rufous-capped Spinetail

Spix’s Spinetail

Pale-browed Trehunter: several great views at mid-levels of this bird that usually stays up high.

Buff-fronted Foliage-gleaner: always with mixed flocks, mostly at the Ouro Fino and Birder’s Trail.

Black-capped Foliage-gleaner: at the Ouro Fino Trail.

White-collared Foliage-gleaner

White-eyed Foliage-gleaner

Sharp-billed Treehunter: at the summit of Birder’s Trail.

Plain-winged Woodcreeper

Olivaceous Woodcreeper

Black-billed Scythebill: seen well during a downpour at the Birder’s Trail.

Lesser Woodcreeper

Planalto Woodcreeper: seen often, but one was actually seen foraging at the wooden columns inside the lodge! 

White-throated Woodcreeper: near the lodge and at the Main Track.

Spot-backed Antshrike: at the Jatobá Trail.

Tufted Antshrike: common, seen well near the lodge and the Birder’s Trail.

Giant Antshrike

Variable Antshrike

Spot-breasted Antvireo

Plain Antvireo

Ferruginous Antbird

Ochre-rumped Antbird

Star-throated Antwren

Salvadori’s Antwren: seen on several occasions at the Ouro Fino Trail. It may be a rare bird elsewhere, but not here!

White-shouldered Fire-eye

Squamate Antbird: fantastic views near the lodge.

Short-tailed Antthrush

Such’s Antthrush: seen at the Jatobá Trail

Variegated Antpitta

Rufous Gnateater: at the Main Track.

Black-cheeked Gnateater: several encounters, best views at the Jatobá and Birder’s Trail.

White-breasted Tapaculo

Oustalet’s Tyrannulet: great views at the Birder’s Trail.

Bay-ringed Tyrannulet: a group of several birds foraging at a small tree next to the lodge.

Southern Antpipit

Eared Pigmy-Tyrant

White-throated Spadebill

Yellow-bellied Elaenia

Olivaceous Elaenia

Southern Beardless Tyrannulet

Sepia-capped Flycatcher

Yellow-olive Flycatcher

Euler’s Flycatcher

Gray-hooded Flycatcher

Sulphur-rumped Flycatcher (aka Whiskered)

Long-tailed Tyrant

Boat-billed Flycatcher

Great Kiskadee

Tropical Kingbird

Variegated Flycatcher

Streaked Flycatcher

Swainson’s Flycatcher

Gray-hooded Attila: amazing views at the pond.

Rufous-tailed Attila

Sharpbill: good views at the Birder’s Trail.

Red-ruffed Fruitcrow: good views of this huge cotinga at the Jatobá Trail.

Cinnamon-vented Piha: seen very well at the Jatobá, Main Track and behind the lodge.

Hooded Berryeater: a pair attracted to playback at the Birder’s Trail.

Blue Manakin: mostly young males or females seen, but a single beautiful blue male seen at the Entrance Track.

Pin-tailed Manakin, seen well behind the lodge and at the Ouro Fino Trail.

Wing-barred Piprites: pairs seen at the Ouro Fino and Birder’s Trail.

Greenish Schiffornis: excellent views of one at the Ouro Fino Trail.

Crested Becard

Chestnut-crowned Becard

Black-tailed Tityra: seen very well at the lodge and at the Fita Branca viewpoint.

Red-eyed Vireo

Rufous-crowned Greenlet: behind the lodge, twice.

Rufous-browed Peppershrike

Southern Rough-winged Swallow

Blue-and-white Swallow

Southern House Wren

Long-billed Gnatwren

Veery: very interesting record of this north american migrant. Little is known about the wintering grounds of this species. Seen at second growth near the lodge.

Rufous-bellied Thrush

Pale-breasted Thrush

White-necked Thrush

Yellow-legged Thrush

Rufous-headed Tanager

Green-headed Tanager

Red-necked Tanager

Blue Dacnis

Azure-shouldered Tanager

Palm Tanager

Red-crowned Ant-Tanager

Olive-green Tanager

Ruby-crowned Tanager

Black-goggled Tanager

Magpie Tanager

Bananaquit

Rufous-collared Sparrow

Temminck’s Seedeater: at the Entrance Track.

Double-collared Seedeater

Blue-black Grassquit

Uniform Finch: several inside forest and a good view at the Entrance Track.

Black-throated Grosbeak: good views of immature birds at the Main Track.

Masked Yellowthroat: at the Entrance Track before the parking lot.

Golden-crowned Warbler

Riverbank Warbler: at the Ouro Fino river.

Red-rumped Cacique

Chestnut-bellied Euphonia.